Brain Trauma Rehabilitation Terms [Easy Guide Arounds Difficult Words] – Part 2

Many of us are so overwhelmed by the process of TBI diagnosis, treatment, and traumatic brain injury rehab, that we don’t even think to ask the important questions or understand everything that the doctor says. A good physician will explain the tests, the diagnosis and the necessary rehabilitation in layman’s terms, but some won’t, or maybe the stress of the visit will make you forget as soon as you leave the office.

In Part 1 of this Guide, we’ve explained some of these terms, especially the ones concerning functions and skills. Today, in Part 2, we’ll explain more terms, concerning some of the symptoms of TBI.

Agnosia:

Failure to recognize familiar objects although the sensory mechanism is intact. May occur for any sensory modality.

Anoxia:

Lack of oxygen to the brain.

Aphasia:

The inability to produce voluntary speech due to a deficit in motor (muscle) programming caused by brain damage.

Apraxia:

Loss of the capability to perform learned determined movements, regardless of having the will to perform the movements.

Ataxia:

A problem of muscle coordination not due to apraxia, weakness, stiffness, spasticity or sensory loss. Triggered by lesion of the cerebellum, or basal ganglia. It can affect a person’s ability to walk, talk, eat and to execute other self-care tasks.

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Confusion:

A state in which a patient is bewildered, perplexed, or incapable to self-orient.

Disinhibition:

Incapability to control impulsive behavior and emotions.

Dysarthria:

A problem in forming words, or articulating them because of the weakness of muscles used in speaking. Speech is characterized by slurred, imprecise enunciation. Tongue movements are usually labored and the rate of speaking may be very slow. Voice
quality may be irregular, frequently disproportionately nasal; volume may be low; drooling may transpire. Dysarthria may go together with aphasia, or occur on its own.

Dysphagia:

Difficulty in swallowing. It also comprises a struggle to move material from the mouth to the stomach. This definition also includes difficulty in positioning food in the mouth.

Fatigue:

A state of tiredness; the loss of strength or stamina.

  • Acute: Fatigue with sudden onset, such as subsequent to excessive effort; relieved by rest.
  • Chronic: Long-continued fatigue not relieved by rest. Symptomatic of conditions, such as tuberculosis, diabetes or other diseases of changed body metabolism.
  • Muscular: The reduced ability of a muscle to execute work as a result of recurrent contractions. Fatigue can be partial, or complete.

Post-concussion syndrome:

Group of symptoms after a concussion that may consist of memory changes, mood swings, poor concentration, headaches, faintness, depression, and nervousness.

Quadriparesis:

Partial loss of function all four extremities of the body.

Quadriplegia:

Loss of function of any injured or diseased cervical spinal cord section, influencing all four body extremities.

Seizure:

Uncontrolled discharge of nerve cells which may spread to other adjacent cells or all over the brain. It typically lasts only a few minutes. It may be accompanied by loss of consciousness, loss of bowel and bladder control and tremors. May also cause hostility, and other behavioral deviations.

Spasticity:

Involuntary increase in muscle tone that occurs following injury to the brain or spinal cord, causing muscles to resist being moved.

Vegetative State:

Condition in which the person doesn’t speak, follow commands, or give any response that is psychologically meaningful.

Stay tuned for the third part of this TBI glossary guide.

NeuLife Rehabilitation –  one of the best traumatic brain injury rehabilitation facilities!

NeuLife Rehabilitation is one of the best TBI rehab centers with specialized catastrophic rehabilitation programs for a wide range of catastrophic injuries. 

Our programs for traumatic brain injury rehabilitation are customized to meet the individual needs of each patient, and care plans are structured to promote the highest level of functional independence and successful community reintegration. Through the skills and experience of our highly trained team of clinical experts, we are able to treat a wide range of diagnoses and injuries at our brain injury rehab facility.

If you have any more questions concerning neuro rehab, brain injury rehab, or any other issue regarding traumatic brain injury rehabilitation, call us to make an appointment today. You can also schedule a tour to visit our best brain injury facility. 

Sources:

http://www.headinjury.com/tbiglossary.htm

http://www.waiting.com 

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The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE PROVIDING OF MEDICAL ADVICE, and is not intended to be a substitute for independent professional medical judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your health.

Acquired Brain Injury: An Integrative Neuro-Rehabilitation Approach [2nd Edition]

Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) – what is it?

 

Acquired brain injury refers to any type of brain damage that happens after birth. Causes of ABI include disease, blows to the head, alcohol and drug use, or oxygen deprivation.

ABI does not entail damage to the brain resulting from neurodegenerative disorders.

Coping with the outcomes of acquired brain injury can be challenging for everyone, including family members.

2nd edition of a book about ABI

In July this year, Springer has published a new, improved edition of a comprehensive book called “Acquired Brain Injury: An Integrative Neuro-Rehabilitation Approach”. It can be of interest to all healthcare professionals in the field of neurology, and specifically ABI (Acquired Brain Injury), as well as ABI survivors and their families.

The book presents a comprehensive interdisciplinary team approach to the rehabilitation of acquired brain injury (ABI) survivors. Medical and clinical specialists will receive a deeper understanding of not only each other’s roles but of their corresponding roles in this field.

Book contents

 

In this publication, you will find, among many subjects:

  • a comprehensive chapter on physical therapy in ABI, 
  • updated chapters on neuropsychology, speech-language and occupational therapies, including new technology and strategies as well as evidence-based methods,
  • psychosocial challenges and treatment following ABI,
  • the value of family as team members,
  • post neuro rehabilitation choices and experiences.

Acquired Brain Injury: An Integrative Neuro-Rehabilitation Approach” 2nd edition provides evidence and context concerning the rehabilitation goals and processes for rehabilitation specialists, interdisciplinary students of neuro rehabilitation and practicing clinicians.

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Many case examples are provided, illustrating a wide spectrum of challenges and steps of recovery. This edition features 3 completely new chapters and various updated chapters by new and returning authors (with Jean Elbaum as the editor).

 

NeuLife Rehabilitation – The Best Neuro Rehab Facility!

 

NeuLife Rehabilitation is one of the largest residential post-acute rehabilitation facilities in the Southeast with specialized neuro rehabilitation programs for a wide range of catastrophic injuries. 

Our programs for neuro rehab are customized to meet the individual needs of each patient, and care plans are structured to promote the highest level of functional independence and successful community reintegration. With the skills and experience of our highly trained team of clinical experts, we are able to treat a wide range of diagnoses and injuries at our brain injury facility.

If you have any more questions concerning neuro rehab, brain rehab, or any other issues regarding brain injury, call us to make an appointment today. You can also schedule a tour to visit our brain injury facility. 

 

Source: 

https://www.springer.com/gp/product-marketing-tool/flyer/9783030166120?downloadType=PRODUCTFLYER 

 

The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE PROVIDING OF MEDICAL ADVICE, and is not intended to be a substitute for independent professional medical judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your health.

 

Brain Trauma Rehabilitation Terms [Easy Guide Around Difficult Words] – Part 1

Many of us are so overwhelmed by the process of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) diagnosis, treatment, and traumatic brain injury rehabilitation, that we don’t even think to ask the important questions, or understand everything that the doctor says. A good physician will explain the tests, the diagnosis and the necessary rehabilitation in layman’s terms, but some don’t.

Here are some terms you might find useful when talking to healthcare staff about traumatic brain injury.

Cognition:

The conscious process of knowing, or being aware of thoughts, or perceptions, including understanding and reasoning.

Cognitive functions:

Involving higher mental functioning – learning, memory, imagination, comprehension, decision making. Also, the means by which an individual becomes aware of people, objects, and situations in the environment and their subjective, symbolic meaning.

Executive functions:

The capacities necessary to formulate, plan and carry out tasks effectively. These functions are essential for independent, creative and socially constructive behavior. These are controlled by the frontal lobe.

Neuropsychological Functions:

Brain functions relating to behavior based on the results of standardized tests, history, present circumstances, attitudes and the expectations of the patient as well as the patient’s behavior during the examination.

Perception:

The ability to make sense of what one sees, hears, feels, tastes, or smells. Perceptual
losses are often very subtle and the patient and/or family are unaware of them.

Problem-solving:

Ability to bring the cognitive process to figure out how to do a task.

Range of motion (ROM):

The normal range of movement of any body joint. Range of motion also refers to exercises designed to maintain this range and prevent contractures.

Reasoning:

The ability to think logically.

Withdrawal:

Response to a physical danger, or severe stress characterized by a state of apathy, lethargy, depression, and retreat into oneself.

Abstract thinking:

Being able to apply abstract concepts to new situations and surroundings.

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Community skills:

Those abilities needed to function independently in the community. They may include telephone skills, money management, pedestrian skills, use of public transportation, meal planning, and cooking.

Concentration:

The ability to focus on a given task, or set of stimuli for an appropriate period of time.

Concrete thinking:

A style of thinking in which the individual sees each situation as unique and is unable to generalize from the similarities between situations. Language and perceptions are interpreted literally so that a proverb such as “a stitch in time saves nine” cannot be readily grasped

Disinhibition:

Inability to suppress (inhibit) impulsive behavior and emotions.

Disorientation:

Not knowing where you are, who you are, or the current date. Health professionals often speak of a normal person as being oriented “times three” which refers to person, place and time

Stay tuned for the second part of this TBI glossary guide.

NeuLife Rehabilitation –  one of the best Brain Trauma Rehabilitation facilities!

NeuLife Rehabilitation is one of the best TBI rehab centers with specialized catastrophic rehabilitation programs for a wide range of catastrophic injuries.

Our programs for brain trauma rehabilitation are customized to meet the individual needs of each patient, and care plans are structured to promote the highest level of functional independence and successful community reintegration. Through the skills and experience of our highly trained team of clinical experts, we are able to treat a wide range of diagnoses and injuries at our brain injury facility.

If you have any more questions concerning neuro rehab, brain rehab, or any other issue regarding brain injury, call us to make an appointment today. You can also schedule a tour to visit our best brain injury facility.

 

The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE PROVIDING OF MEDICAL ADVICE, and is not intended to be a substitute for independent professional medical judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your health.

How to Make the Most of Your Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitation [5 Essential Tips]

The outcome of your TBI rehabilitation depends on many factors – the initial diagnosis and prognosis, your rehabilitation team and plan, as well as individual abilities – before and after the catastrophic event. 

However, what some patients and healthcare professionals can forget, is that the TBI victims themselves have an amazing impact on the TBI rehabilitation outcome. Here are 5 tips on how to maximize your recovery from a traumatic brain injury, stroke or other types of brain injury. 

1. STAY POSITIVE 

People react to a catastrophe in many ways. It is natural to lose hope, or fall into despair for some time in this challenging time. But, those who do the best in rehab usually will see negative situations as an opportunity to grow and develop.  

When you can spend less time and energy on looking back and dwelling on the past and focus your energy on looking forward to building your future, life WILL get better.

The time of recovery can be an opportunity to get to know yourself in a new light. To redefine your life and yourself. By doing that, you may find new kinds of satisfaction and a new sense of purpose in your life. 

Using the help of trained therapists and psychologists can be a crucial part of this process. They will make sure you stay on the right track and help you in every way you need.

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2. USE YOUR DETERMINATION

People with a brain injury often say that TBI rehabilitation is the biggest challenge of their lives. It is a great task indeed, getting your life back after such a traumatic event. While the life you get back may not be exactly the same, how far you go in recovery depends on how much you invest. It is important to not overdo things as fatigue is a common symptom, but a steady consistent approach to rehab makes a big difference in the long run. Remember, it’s a marathon, not a sprint, so stay determined!

3. MAINTAIN STRUCTURE & ROUTINE

After a brain injury, the need for structure and routine is extremely important – it allows the brain to rest and save its energy for rehabilitation. 

To make sure you stay on top of things and don’t overload your brain, prepare a schedule that you can follow. You can use a big poster, or a whiteboard. Make sure to find the space for mealtimes, rehabilitation tasks and exercises, seeing your friends, as well as quiet rest periods.

Make sure that your diet is healthy and you eat at the same time each day. You can use one of many apps existing in the market – they will calculate the daily intake of macro- and microelements important for your health.

Regular exercise is good for your health and maintaining a positive attitude. Account for suitable activities in your weekly routine. If necessary, check with your rehab team, or doctor about the right exercise plan. 

Go to bed at the same time each night, making sure that your evening routine is calming and relaxing. While it is good to find the time to nap during the day to restore your energy, it is not recommended to sleep too long in the daytime. Day sleeping can disturb your night sleep, which is very important when it comes to your brain recovery. 

4. ACCEPT YOUR FAMILY’S AND FRIENDS’ HELP

You may have heard your doctor asking about your support system, as it is vital in rehabilitation. A support system is a group of family members and friends invested in your recovery. They will support you and help you, with the guidance of your healthcare professionals’ team. 

What happens often, is that TBI victims will often reject this help in the search of their own independence, out of despair, or shame. If you do that, you will risk just the opposite – your rehabilitation will be slower and more painful. A common key to success with rehabilitation is having your family and friends involved. 

Make time to stay in touch with friends and work this into your schedule. This can be difficult as meeting a friend for coffee can be exhausting during the recovery phase. There are easier options, such as a quick phone call, or sending an email. 

If there are people in your life who want to support you, make sure they know your needs. Do not expect them to guess, you are the only person who knows how they can really help. Whether it’s just talking, walking with you, or accompanying you to a doctor’s visit, these are all small gestures with great impact on your rehab outcome.

5. USE THE HELP OF SUPPORT GROUPS

Support groups can play a vital role – not only for the person with a brain injury, but their carers and family members. It is a chance to connect with others with similar problems, feel understood, and discuss solutions to problems. In remote areas, many find that online support groups on the Internet are very useful. 

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Take Rehabilitation Into Your Own Hands

Some people manage catastrophic events well, surviving with much less effect than others. The key to an excellent recovery from a traumatic brain injury will often be due to all of the factors that we have covered. 

According to the publication “Brain Injury Medicine”, “resilience, motivation, hope and courage are the hallmarks of patients who do well in rehabilitation”. So make sure you have all of these in abundance, and in the time of need, turn to your friends, family and support groups. You are not alone!

NeuLife Rehabilitation –  one of the best TBI rehab centers!

NeuLife Rehabilitation is one of the best TBI rehab centers with specialized catastrophic rehabilitation programs for a wide range of catastrophic injuries. 

Our programs for neuro rehab are customized to meet the individual needs of each patient, and care plans are structured to promote the highest level of functional independence and successful community re-integration. Through the skills and experience of our highly trained team of clinical experts, we are able to treat a wide range of diagnoses and injuries at our brain injury facility.

If you have any more questions concerning neuro rehab, brain rehab, or any other issue regarding brain injury, call us to make an appointment today. You can also schedule a tour to visit our best brain injury facility. 

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The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE PROVIDING OF MEDICAL ADVICE, and is not intended to be a substitute for independent professional medical judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your health.

The Effects Of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) On Daily Life

Our brain is the “control center” for all of our human activities including thinking, sensing, judgment, emotions, breathing and moving. Therefore injuries to your brain can have a significant impact on your daily functioning.

The main purpose of rehabilitation after suffering TBI is allowing you to return to the best functionality possible and making sure that your daily life is not affected. Here is a list of possible effects of TBI on your daily life. Remember, there are no two similar cases of TBI, and its effects differ for each patient.

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The effects of Traumatic Brain Injury are divided into three categories:

  1. Physical Impacts 

Depending on what part of the brain was injured, TBI can have varying degrees of impact on mobility. It can cause:

  • spasticity (increased muscle tone that interferes with normal movement), 
  • hemiparesis or hemiplegia (weakness or paralysis affecting one side of the body more than another), 
  • ataxia (uncontrolled tremors), 
  • sensory impairment (hearing, vision, smell, touch, taste), 
  • headaches
  • dizziness
  • sleep changes,
  • fatigue/loss of stamina,
  • difficulties with speech,
  • bladder, bowel, and swallowing difficulties,
  • balance and coordination problems.

Every person with TBI has a specific set of physical effects. Also, each person has a unique pace of recovery.

2. Cognitive (Thinking) Impacts 

Depending on what part of the brain was injured, TBI can cause problems with attention & focus, memory, language (for example, aphasia or organizing your thoughts and ideas), impairment in visual-perceptual skills, initiative-taking, problem-solving, and reduced perception and empathy. 

Other possible cognitive effects of TBI may include:

  • difficulty with concentration
  • distractibility
  • memory problems
  • the slow speed of processing
  • confusion
  • perseveration, which is the abnormal persistent repetition of a word, gesture, or act
  • impulsiveness
  • difficulty with language processing

TBI victims may also experience problems with executive functions, which include planning, cognitive flexibility, abstract thinking, rule acquisition (determining right from wrong), initiating appropriate actions, and inhibiting inappropriate actions

3. Emotional / Behavioral Impacts 

Finally, TBI can take a toll on emotional and behavioral capacity. Common changes seen in those with brain injury include: 

  • loss of inhibition
  • impulsiveness
  • irritability and/or aggression
  • obsession
  • apathy
  • egocentricity
  • dependent behaviors
  • fluctuating emotions
  • lack of motivation
  • depression
  • denial or lack of awareness.

The effects of TBI can be long-lasting, or even permanent. While recovery and rehabilitation are possible, most people with TBI face life challenges that will require them to adapt and adjust to a new reality.

Well adjusted, individualized rehabilitation is key to the return to a functional and independent life. When comparing your rehabilitation options, make sure to choose one of the best brain injury rehabilitation centers.

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NeuLife Rehabilitation – The Best Brain Injury Facility!

NeuLife Rehabilitation is one of best brain injury rehabilitation centers with specialized catastrophic rehabilitation programs for a wide range of catastrophic injuries. 

Our programs for neuro rehab are customized to meet the individual needs of each patient, and care plans are structured to promote the highest level of functional independence and successful community reintegration. With the skills and experience of our highly trained team of clinical experts, we are able to treat a wide range of diagnoses and injuries at our brain injury facility.

If you have any more questions concerning neuro rehab, brain rehab, or any other issue regarding brain injury, call us to make an appointment today. You can also schedule a tour to visit our best brain injury facility. 

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The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE PROVIDING OF MEDICAL ADVICE, and is not intended to be a substitute for independent professional medical judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your health.